Reverse engineer. Blogger.

Posts tagged programming

In early June I decided I wanted to learn iOS app development using Swift. I’ve made a lot of progress over the last month, building two apps that I can use on my own phone, and one app that I’m now in beta testing via TestFlight with a few friends. Over the last month I’ve […]

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Arguments aren’t parameters

Eevee on the names of things in programming languages: Part of the problem here is that we’re not actually doing computer science. We’re doing programming, with a wide variety (hundreds!) of imperfect languages with different combinations of features and restrictions. There are only so many words to go around, so the same names get used […]

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On Saturday I braved the frigid temperatures and attended a Wilkes-Barre Programming meetup at the Osterhout Free Library in downtown Wilkes-Barre. I arrived a few minutes late – it was Saturday so of course I had to make myself some breakfast, enjoy my coffee, watch a little YouTube prior to getting out in the elements […]

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Hacking rather than waiting

Yesterday afternoon Sarah Pressler retweeted Jono Young’s request for a plugin that would add a submenu to the WordPress’ Admin with the current pages for the site under the Pages menu. This would reduce the number of clicks to get to the page editor. I was waiting for an upload to finish and I thought, given the code […]

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Linus Torvalds in 2004 on the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML): To me, the biggest thing with small patches is not necessarily the patch itself. I think that much more important than the patch is the fact that people get used to the notion that they can change the kernel – not just on an […]

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Kevin Montrose of Stack Overflow explaining Documentation: Documentation is community-curated, example-focused developer documentation, based on the principles of Stack Overflow. A natural extension to Stack Overflow and a welcome one. I should likely make this my homepage.

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Need something like this? Consider hiring me for your next project. I was recently asked by a client if I could use an existing Excel spreadsheet and create a single-page web site from it. This way, their team would be able to use the work they’ve already done and the data they’ve already keyed in and wouldn’t need […]

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Richard Lander on the .NET Blog: We are excited to announce the release of .NET Core 1.0, ASP.NET Core 1.0 and Entity Framework Core 1.0, available on Windows, OS X and Linux! .NET Core is a cross-platform, open source, and modular .NET platform for creating modern web apps, microservices, libraries and console applications. They said they would, and […]

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If you find yourself needing something like this, why not hire me to make it for you? A friend of mine somewhat recently became a licensed realtor. One thing that surprised him was the lack of technology being used in his workplace. Though not a technologist himself, he enjoys an efficient workflow such as using a […]

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One of my recent client programming projects (hire me here) was to help a company migrate all customers, cards, plans, and subscriptions from one Stripe account to another as a result of an acquisition. I hadn’t needed to do anything like this in the past and I ended up fumbling my way through a few […]

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PHP is pretty bad

Since I wrote “I’m perfectly happy using PHP” last week I figured I’d show the other side’s viewpoint as well. There are those out there that loathe the language. Evee goes off on PHP like no one else could:

Her analogy to a toolbox full of tools that you can’t really use properly is apt. I do feel like I write a lot of workarounds for things. I’ve always thought it was due to the depth of my knowledge of the language. Perhaps it isn’t. Perhaps it is indicative of it.

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I had Unmark’d Kyle Slattery’s post on his company site (which I think is rather good looking; here is why) regarding why his company uses Ruby on Rails. It is a good post. Notice this bit:

Bingo. By the time I finish editing this post seventeen more frameworks, libraries, or pseudo-languages will have been released. And honestly, that is fantastic. Because out of those a few will take off, be well supported, and become great utilities for future projects to benefit from.

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git from the inside out

Mary Rose Cook: The essay focuses on the graph structure that underpins Git and the way the properties of this graph dictate Git’s behavior. Looking at fundamentals, you build your mental model on the truth rather than on hypotheses constructed from evidence gathered while experimenting with the API. This truer model gives you a better […]

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My Web: Yesterday and Today

This “Web 2.0” that we’re all so accustomed to lately is great. Semantic, accessible, open, and dripping with fantastic design. However, there are times I reminisce about the days of old, the days of well – Web 1.0. There are several sites, some still in existence that I really do miss. I remember spending hours […]

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