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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

Follow: @c2dev2, RSS, JSON, Micro.blog.

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Learn 1Password

Shawn Blanc, writing at The Sweet Setup:

Learn 1Password will be a deep dive on one of our most irreplaceable apps. We’ll show you how 1Password works, and we’ll go through all the different ways you can use it: from a digital will, to sharing important information with your team members and family members, to having instant access to any of your vital documents in case of emergency.

Within the last month I set up a 1Password Family Plan and migrated all of my accounts, and most of Eliza’s accounts, into it. I still have more work to do but I can tell you that it immediately reduced cognitive load and anxiety around passwords but it can do much more than that. It looks like Blanc is going to help more people find that out.

Finished Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy over the weekend ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ . A laugh-out-loud read for sure.

While I’m not drawn to the new Samsung phones I’m very glad to see them pushing the envelope. Huge screen, massive performance, can get 1TB of space in your pocket, a pen, USB-C, tons of RAM. This is truly a computer in your pocket.

Try to help @manton and @macgenie with Micro.blog support. They will likely need it. If you see someone asking a question and you know that answer, simply reply. (This would be easier with search. When Mastodon blew up this also happened.)

Things about Windows 10 #2: Moving non-existent windows

Well, I had said I’d try to keep this series positive but every now and then you run up against a problem.

It turns out Windows 10 is fairly terrible at remembering window sizes and placement when connecting to or disconnecting from an external display. So far I’ve had issues going both ways and having to rearrange all of my windows each time. On the Mac, it always remembers how I like my windows arranged in each context. I’m connected to an external display most of the time so I only feel this pain a few times per week.

This turns out to be a particularly frustrating issue if an app, like DropIt, doesn’t have a Taskbar item. It means you can’t “get a window back” onto the primary display without some sort of trickery.

Here is what you do: select the app by clicking on the primary icon for it, type Alt then Space then M (not at the same time) and that will allow you to move the “lost” window with your arrow keys to get it back.

So Brent is done and so is Matt. Even if all of us very early Twitter power users (I was user 10,000 or so) left Twitter it wouldn’t matter to them at all. Brent is correct. Saying Twitter is bad is better said with your feet than your fingers. I rarely tweet these days and write here much more. I think I’ll continue for 30 more years at least.

It will never happen, but imagine a world where “everyone” that uses Twitter just posted to their own blog? What a world that would be! I do, however, see another fairly large exodus happening. It won’t hurt Twitter one iota.

Magic Leap hype

First line in this Wired piece about the Magic Leap One:

In retrospect, Magic Leap CEO Rony Abovitz realizes that all the hype was a big mistake. “I think we were arrogant,” he says.

Umm, yeah.

/via Daring Fireball.

Magic Leap One Creator Edition

Adi Robertson for The Verge:

But the Magic Leap One’s 50-degree diagonal field of view, while larger than the competing Microsoft HoloLens, is still extremely limited. And the image quality feels roughly on par with the two-year-old HoloLens. It’s generally good, but with some tracking and transparency issues. Given how much effort Magic Leap has apparently put into cultivating internal creative teams and outside partners, we were also disappointed at the lack of substantial experiences from them. But that last thing, at least, isn’t a major issue for developers right now — since they can now buy Magic Leap’s hardware and start testing their own stuff.

Overall she gives the hardware a very positive review, the software a very lukewarm review, and the “experience” a “meh”. While this release is for developers to get their hands on the devices, I believe the hype this company has built around itself has hurt them. No matter what they showed in this first version it would have been disappointing to many.

I’ve personally never used a HoloLens nor a Magic Leap so I’ll still hold out judgement until I do. But I do think Magic Leap is playing a dangerous game with the hype machine. They should try to lower expectations before their consumer or business devices hit the market. This way when the press covers them the reviews will be glowing rather than lukewarm.

Colin Walker takes a break (so I will too)

Colin Walker:

I’m not going to be blogging much – maybe the occasional post but nothing regular. I’m going to remove my feed from micro.blog for the time being so that I’m not drawn into conversations there that might result from any posts – if any conversations occur they will have to happen locally, for now.

That isn’t a reflection on Manton and the micro.blog service, I still think he is doing a wonderful job and it keeps going from strength to strength, it’s just not somewhere I need to be at the moment and something I need to do for me.

I’ve recently thought about doing something similar. Lately publishing to Facebook, Instagram, and my blog have felt like a bit of a chore. As such, I’m actually behind on my blogging. Which starts to create this odd pressure (that is only self-induced). I’ve taken many breaks in the past. They feel great and usually result in coming back with fresh perspectives.

So I’m going to join my friend-from-across-the-ocean Colin and hop off of this blog, all social media, YouTube and my RSS reader for all of August.

Comments are closed. See you in September.