Menu

Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

Like? Subscribe.

On YouTube? Check out my channel.

A narrow pond with a hill in the distance.

Sickler’s Pond to Elk Hill – August 2019

I still have a lot to learn about manually creating HDR images using my drone. This was my first attempt. You’ll notice the sky and foreground are both properly exposed. A nice technique to have when needed.

What I saw this week #59: August 23, 2019

At this point, the WISTW posts are woefully inaccurately titled and inconsistent in their schedule. The following are a few things I’ve seen recently that you may enjoy – but were certainly not just from this week.

Now, to think about what to rename this series of occasional links.

Om Malik, on his photo journey

Om:

I find using a 24mm wide angle lens, a 90 mm medium telephoto, or a 280 mm tele lens akin to using saffron in my rice or black salt in my lentils – flavors that are beautiful in their restraint.

I like reading his perspective on this. Less is definitely more. And constraints breed creativity. It is something I very much subscribe to myself with many things in life. And I’m drawn to some things that focused on constraints such as early Instagram or The White Stripes.

With my own photography, however, I view each tool as a different camera for a different project. I have a few select lenses for my DSLR, I use my Pixel 2 XL profusely, and I also have a DJI Phantom 4 Pro to be my eye in the sky. Some photos I’d never be able to capture using a single lens.

Along the way, whenever I hit a wall, as I do with all my questions, I turned to YouTube for the answers. It is a marvelous school, with easy-to-find tips and tricks galore.

I find YouTube indispensable.

I have been experimenting with editing my older photos with my new workflow and making interpretations of those archival images. But the biggest realization this has produced is that, unless the photos start off on the right foot inside the camera, it is difficult to reach a rewarding final interpretation.

I do this too. It is a fun exercise to see how you’d approach the editing of a photograph long after you’ve taken it. Like Om, I find that I would have shot the photo entirely differently just a few months or a year after I’ve taken it. Just like my palette has changed over the years (first, sweet wine then dry, first lighter beers than more bitter ones, first smokey scotches and now rye bourbons) so has my eye. And that is ok. The older photos aren’t worse or better – they were taken by a different person than I am today.

You can see Om’s photos on his photolog.

Bokeh: Private, independent, and user-funded photo sharing

Timothy Smith, on trying to promote his Kickstarter for Bokeh:

I hate doing this type of stuff, but I feel like this idea is so important it’d be foolish of me not to try. Even if this Kickstarter ends up being unsuccessful, I won’t be able to live with myself if I didn’t do everything in my power.

We can help him. We have blogs, accounts on Twitter, Micro.blog, Mastodon etc. Take two minutes to review Bokeh’s Kickstarter, back it if you’d like, but please write a short post to help him spread the word. And perhaps directly message a few people you know that could help as well.

As a community we can all help each other with our audiences – even if they are tiny. I always try to promote things people are building with my blog and even if I only help move the needle a very small amount – together perhaps we can make a difference for Tim and Bokeh and for others in our community building things and putting them out into the world.

My photo in the Lackawanna County Visitors Bureau Spring Visitors Guide

I’m always pleased when my photos can be put to good use. It is why I license my photos the way that I do.

A few months ago the Lackawanna County Visitors Bureau reached out and asked if they could use one of my photos (with credit) in their Spring Visitors Guide.

My photo in the Spring Visitors Guide
Complete with credit

Of course they can!

They chose this photo of geese at Aylesworth Park – a park I visit quite often during the year for hiking.

I’m very happy with how it turned out. Be sure to pick up a guide and get out this spring and discover Lackawanna County.

What I saw this week #57 – February 29, 2019

Don’t have time to get to all of these links today? No problem. Try Unmark (I’ll send you an invite if you’d like.)

Also, there are tons more.

  • Apollo-related stuff: With it being the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo program there is a slew of content surfacing this year. Here are a few things I’ve enjoyed and a few things I’m looking forward to.
  • WWW – the original proposal for what is now the internet.
  • Financial Windfalls – Topic interviewed 15 people about what they did with sudden influxes of cash ranging from a few thousand dollars to huge piles of dough. Interesting read.
  • Why do Zebras have stripes? – I don’t think I would have guessed the reason.
  • Stephen Wolfram’s computer set up – I thought I was bad by being picky. While not nearly as outrageous, this reminds me of Richard Stallman’s rider.
  • 50,000 images of the moon – Composite image of the moon created from 50,000 images. Very cool.
  • The Lion Whisperer – I remember a few GoPro promo videos with Kevin Richardson but I recently came across his channel on YouTube randomly. Fascinating YouTube channel and unbelievably incredible animals.

Reminder: These lists are never exhaustive. And I don’t keep impeccable records. I use Unmark to save most of these but by-and-large I allow some randomness into this process to create these lists.

I’m always looking for interesting things so please feel free to send a few my way if you find something you think I might be interested in.

So I didn’t win Apple’s #ShotOniPhone challenge. But, man, the photos that did win are incredible.

Licensing my images

(If I sent you to this page, it is likely because you’re in violation of my license. Please read.)

For the last few years my photos have been licensed as attribution only by a simple statement on the bottom of my web page in my footer. My images get stolen, without credit, a lot.

Since my licensing wasn’t all that official I’ve decided to take a moment to choose a Creative Commons license that I feel affords me to take action against some of those thieves while still maintaining the spirit of how I want to share my work.

So, I’ve chosen the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) license.

This means that:

  • Anyone can use my images for non-commercial purposes for free
  • Anyone that uses my images must provide attribution, or credit, linking back to my web site using my full name
  • Anyone can modify my images for their use but they must also license their modifications using the same license I am using
  • Cannot sell my images, or modifications of my images

I’ve modified my web site to clearly show that my images are licensed this way (see example). Anyone from this date that takes my image and uses them, even as a simple post on social media, without following the terms of this license is going to get a wet willy at the very least.

If you’ve used my photo and haven’t given me credit it is really simple to rectify the situation. Edit your social media post or web site to give clear attribution to me, using my full name, and a link back to my web site.

Thank you.

Is Instagram about to plummet?

When Instagram first started to hit popularity – long after their failed attempt at being a check-in service – the app was all about photo filters. Anyone could snap a photo with their phone and quickly add a filter to make it look “better” or at least more interesting. It made everyone feel like a photographer.

At first “true” photographers balked at the platform. But then they saw the power of the network it was building so they started to sign up. Which created a boon for the platform and its Explore page because whenever we opened the app we saw gorgeous photos of the people, places and things we are interested in.

But this created pressure. I dubbed it Instagram pressure. It meant that the “anyone” (those that do not consider themselves photographers but enjoyed adding a filter to their photos) I mentioned before felt out of place. Incapable of producing such high quality, and often composite, results. So their usage began to wane. They were still looking but not posting as much.

Then the algorithmic timeline. Which made for completely different issues. It meant that really great photos from people with less of a following were getting little to no attention. And like-fatigue set in. Instagram had a problem but they had smart founders. They new they needed to act quickly.

So Instagram gobbled up Snapchat by stealing the medium of Stories and (in my opinion) improving on them. Which created another bolt of energy into the platform as there was now a way to create and publish far more content that didn’t need the same polish as a photo.

But then Facebook happened. True, Facebook purchased Instagram 6 years ago but it has only been the last 24 months that Facebook has taken a nosedive in public opinion. And with the founders of Instagram leaving the platform my own personal confidence in Instagram is at an all time low. In fact, I’ve stopped updating the app. I love Instagram as it stands right now. But I fear the next few updates.

Anyone that has been online for many years has seen the rise and fall of countless services for a variety of reasons. Mostly, though, the fall of a platform has something to do with some mass of individuals that originally embrace a platform eventually leaving a platform. Teens jump on Snapchat and move to Instagram and then move to TikTok or Musically. Tech people blog then tweet then blog again (yay!). Photographers use their own sites, then Flickr, then Instagram, then their own sites (and/or Flickr) again. At least, that is what seems to be happening.

Instagram has a huge backer, otherwise I think it’s decline would be as meteoric as its rise. So I don’t think it or Facebook will be gone any time soon. But I do have the feeling we will see photographers slowly leave the platform behind in order to publish elsewhere – whether that be their own web sites or Flickr or SmugMug or an as-yet-unreleased platform.

South Iceland – September 2018

In mid-September Eliza, my niece Keri, and I explored the south of Iceland. These photos are but a handful of the thousands we captured on our adventure through the volcanic island. What a place! I hope I get back to explore other areas in the future.