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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

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Responses to RSS isn’t dead. Subscribing is alive.

There were a number of responses to RSS isn’t dead. Subscribing is alive. Partly due to being on Micro.blog Discover and perhaps also due to Brent Simmons linking to it (thanks Brent!).

Chris Aldrich:

I’ve been enamored of the way that SubToMe has abstracted things to create a one click button typically with a “Follow Me” or “Subscribe” tag on it.

SubToMe seems interesting. A single button that gives the user a ton of options to subscribe. For now, I’m sticking with my Subscribe page that gives a short description of what Subscribing is and where they can do it. Perhaps I’ll extend the list of services in the future.

Jeremy Cherfas:

As for tools creating better ways to surface stuff, Newsblur does allow you to train it, which to me seems more useful than using an algorithm to train me.

I don’t need an algorithm personally. I actually like the urgency having many subscriptions creates. It forces me to weed through my subscriptions from time-to-time and unload a few. But I’m glad to hear Newsblur has something they are working on for this.

Rian van der Merwe:

I really like how you structured your “Subscribe” page in a way that non-tech people would understand. I went with “Follow” as the title, since that’s a word that has become synonymous with getting updates. What are your thoughts on Follow vs. Subscribe?

Follow is likely the more modern and widely popular verb. I think each network has had to make this choice on its own to help users infer what type of place they signed up for. Facebook has “friend”, Twitter “follow”, LinkedIn “connect”. Each of these verbs have meaning. Follow and Subscribe are both impersonal enough to fit with blogs but each have their own feeling behind them. Subscribing, to me, feels like I’m reading a publication (whether it be by 1 person or many). Following feels more like I’m one wrung down on a ladder. I could be alone in this feeling though.

As an aside: I’m so happy that blogging is being talked and written about so much over the last few months. 2019 already feels like a boon for one of my favorite things.


Dialog out of beta

Mike Haynes:

We appreciate everyone’s patience as we worked through the development process and look forward to hearing your thoughts and feedback.

Mike may see the development and launch of Dialog as taking longer than he would have liked, but from where I sit the app has come a long way in a relatively short period of time.

Back in May 2018 I linked to Dialog saying that it was “very much beta”. The current version is very much complete. I’m very glad the app exists.

Just updated to the Dialog 2.0 beta. Very, very nice.

Manton Reece on smaller social networks

Manton Reece:

Many people are looking for “the next Twitter”, but it’s not enough to replace Twitter with a new platform and new leadership. Some problems are inevitable when power is concentrated in only 2-3 huge social networks — ad-based businesses at odds with user needs and an overwhelming curation challenge. This might be Mastodon’s greatest contribution: getting people used to the idea of many smaller, interoperable communities.

I agree with this far more today than I have in the past. I too was looking for the next Twitter. But now I’m glad there won’t likely be a replacement but that we will divide our time and interests across many communities. It will likely keep them all more civil and better.

Leo Laporte leaves Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Facebook

Leo Laporte:

Yesterday I deactivated my Twitter account and kicked Tumblr to the curb. A couple of weeks ago I did the same with Instagram. A month or so before that I killed Facebook. And I survived. No, thrived!

I had deleted my Twitter account in the past and lived. And while I haven’t deleted my account again I am on Twitter far less than ever. I spend much more time in my RSS reader (like in 2003 era), dabble on Micro.blog, and now on Mastodon a bit. It feels so much better even if decentralized.

Try to help @manton and @macgenie with Micro.blog support. They will likely need it. If you see someone asking a question and you know that answer, simply reply. (This would be easier with search. When Mastodon blew up this also happened.)

Laura Kalbag on blogging

Laura Kalbag:

When I wrote about owning and controlling my own content, I talked about trying to keep my “content” in its canonical location on my site, and then syndicating it to social networks and other sites. Doing this involves cross-posting, something that can be done manually (literally copying and pasting titles, descriptions, links etc) or through automation. Either way, it’s a real faff. Posting to my site alone is a faff.

It is a bit of a faff*.

In fact, I only syndicate to Micro.blog currently because it is effortless. I do not syndicate to any other social network. I sometimes wish that I were doing so again because I know I would get more readers here as a result, but – as Laura rightfully spells out – I just don’t have the time or energy to devote to getting that working again. I’ve spent countless hours trying to get it to work the way that I’d want it to (and took the time to catalog those issues here on my blog) and I’m just not going to do it again.

/via Jonathan Snook on Twitter.

* I had never seen this word prior to reading her blog post. I had to look it up. Glad I did. Adding this one to my quiver.

Dialog – An Android app for Micro.blog

Dialog:

At launch, the app makes available a number of features you’ll be familiar with from using the Micro.blog service including being able to view your timeline, your mentions, and the Discover page. Currently, you are unable to create a new post. This is planned for a future release.

The current app is very much beta, but you can immediately see the potential for the usefulness of this app. I’m looking forward to seeing how this one matures.

One year of Micro.blog

Manton Reece:

A little over a year ago we started rolling out Micro.blog to Kickstarter backers. So much has happened since then — from new Micro.blog platform features to companion apps like Sunlit and Wavelength — that I wanted to highlight a few milestones.

See also, my interview with Manton earlier this year. So much has happened since that interview was published. Micro.blog has been fun to watch grow.

My only complaint, now that I’ve switched to Android, is that M.b leaves Android users out to dry since all of the clients Manton has released are for iOS only. However, I believe that will change this year as more tools are released for M.b that are cross platform. At least I hope so.

A hearty congratulations to the Micro.blog team on this anniversary. Many more to come.

Micro.blog confusion

Jeena Pa:

I’m still super confused about micro.blog

He then lists just a few things that lead to his confusion.

One of which I also scratched my head about recently. When you view this thread and you click on the timestamp you expect to go directly to the post on M.b so that you can see the replies to that post. In some cases you are taken to M.b and in others you’re taken to the person’s site – which takes you completely out of the context of the conversation and removes your ability to quickly reply.

I don’t know the solution to this issue. But, I look at M.b this way. Micro.blog is still very young. The team is still figuring it all out and we’re all using and supporting the platform as these kinks are being worked out. Some of these decisions would be very difficult to make if there wasn’t any usage so we all just need to keep using the platform as it is taking shape. There are going to be bumpy periods along the way.