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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

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The money problem with open source

Jerod Santo:

I do believe there’s a money problem in open source. If you listen to our shows you know I believe that. It’s just that in open source that problem doesn’t manifest until much later in the process.

It waits until the software has matured, the value has been proven, the community has been built. Then, it sucks the joy out of the developer(s) who gave a gift to the world and turns it in to the worst kind of job. An unpaid job!

The entire post is a worthy read.

We originally open sourced Unmark for one main reason: that it would live on longer than our business did. And that is exactly what happened.

Our business no longer exists but Unmark did for hundreds (if not thousands?) of people running it themselves. And now it is back (invite only as of this writing, but won’t be soon enough) because we brought it back. But someone else could have. And that is the beauty of it.

We will continue to release Unmark as open source for the same reason: that anyone can run it without paying for it for as long as they want regardless if we are around or not.

In fact, unless there were some reason not to, any product I’d build going forward would be done open source. The benefits simply outweigh the drawbacks.

If someone wants to support Unmark they can by subscribing to the hosted version, submitting code fixes or issues via Github, or simply donating.

Testing inconsistent Web Share Target API data with a Progressive Web App

One of the latest things I’ve been working on for Unmark is turning the app into a Progressive Web App (PWA). Among other benefits, this affords Unmark the capability of being a “Web Share Target” on Android. (Sadly, only Android for now)

A Web Share Target is very similar to a feature you likely use every day and may not realize it. When you “Share to” or “Share via” an app (say, Twitter or Facebook or Micro.blog’s iOS app) it automatically picks up the URL, title, etc. from the web page you’re currently on – this is using a similar feature set. For PWA’s, this is called the Web Share Target API.

What happens is that the app you share from sends a small little packet of data to the app or PWA. According to the spec it should be sending three specific items: title, url, and notes.

The issue I’ve been working through is that each app has a different way of sending that data. Some of them exclude one or more of the items and each of them have very different ways of sending “Notes”.

I don’t know why these apps aren’t consistent. I suppose it might be in part because they are handling PWAs the same way they are handling other apps. They are just sending a “chunk” of data and they expect the target app to work through it all.

Today I was noodling how best to set up a test application to install on my Android phone so that I can inspect how these apps share their information. This way I can see exactly what information is being shared how Unmark could work with each of them. And I was going to open source it so that others working on this same issue had something they could use.

But it turns out I don’t need to, the Web Incubator Community Group already has a Web Share Target Test PWA already in place to do this. Just install this app on your Android device’s home screen and “Share To” it.

Thanks to Matt Giuca on the Google Chrome team for pointing me in the right direction. I’m glad this already existed.

I released Unmark 1.7.2 on Github. More about Unmark and its development in the future.

Pinboard acquires Delicious

Maciej Cegłowski:

Do not attempt to compete with Pinboard.

This is excellent.

I use Unmark daily. Partly because I helped will it into existence. If I didn’t use Unmark I’d use Pinboard (for which I have an account that I’ve paid for). And I’m very happy that Delicious (or, as I knew it del.icio.us) is in his hands.

Yes, it is more work to subscribe than to follow, but that is OK with me

Fred Wilson, in A Founder’s Notebook, describing how “hard” it is to subscribe to a blog that isn’t on Tumblr but is on the open internet.

My only complaint is that its not on Tumblr, where it would be an instant and easy follow. It takes more work to follow a blog when its on the open Internet (when you don’t use RSS. i don’t).

Sigh. He’s right, of course, but … sigh.

In the heyday of Google Reader it was the exact same amount of work to subscribe to a blog’s RSS feed as it is to follow a Tumblog on Tumblr. Just one click. But now, with the RSS market so fragmented and waning it has, indeed, become more work to subscribe to blogs on the open Internet than it is to follow on Tumblr or Twitter.

There are initiatives in motion to help with this, but, like so many other great things on the web (see: microformats), they may simply never catch on at scale.

For those interested in how I subscribe to blogs both on the open Internet and elsewhere; I’m currently using Vienna on Mac as my feed reader. I do not read feeds on my iPad (though I used to) or my iPhone. I only read on Mac and filter things into Unmark to read/watch/buy/listen later. For me to subscribe to a blog is pretty painless; copy the URL of the blog, open Vienna, click Subscribe. (I don’t even need to paste.) So it is three steps rather than the one step that Fred needs to take on Tumblr.

I’ll take that hit for blogs I love to be on the open internet any day.