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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

Duffy’s Coffee Company, Clarks Summit, PA – November 2017

This being my day 2 entry of the Micro.blog photo challenge.

Prompton Lake – October 2017


Cedar Ave. Scranton, PA – September 2017

Attending October’s NEPA.js meet up

On Tuesday, October 10 I attended October’s NEPA.js meet up. John George of NEPA Web Solutions was this month’s presenter and his topic was Bitcoin and the Blockchain: Democratizing How We Exchange Value.

I believe all members of NEPA.js would agree, John’s presentation was arguably the best presentation the meet up group has had to-date. Though the Blockchain can seem a complex topic, John did an excellent job describing how it worked, where it is currently being used, and its future potential. Though the meet up was relatively well attended, I left wishing that so many more people had heard his presentation.

To further the lesson beyond the walls of the Scranton Enterprise Center, John also gave each attendee a gift in the form of a wallet containing a single bit of BTC. He also incentivized attendees to claim that bit for themselves by awarding the first few that did so with $50USD in BTC. Those that did it were rewarded indeed since the value of BTC has jumped to new record highs this month. Those that didn’t claim their bit may be kicking themselves for dragging their feet.

John will likely do this presentation again, in some form, under the NEPA Tech banner. Meet up’s like October’s are what is spurring the group to expand the group into a more general direction. This particular presentation had nothing to do with JavaScript – as the name NEPA.js would have you believe – and so we want to make sure each meet up is approachable by all that would be interested. You may remember me saying this over the last few months, and even in January I spelled it out specifically, but now there has been positive steps towards this happening. We’ll have more to announce in the near future.

Thanks to John for the amazing presentation, and for the bitcoin, and to the attendees for the active discussion.

Side note: My apologies for a terrible pano photo. I’ll try to do better next time.


The Giving Tree Wellness Center, Penn Avenue, Scranton, Pa – September 2017

In September Mark Keith and I poked our heads into this brand-new business in Downtown Scranton. They have a nice spot (and sensory deprivation chambers).

Published: October 13, 2017

Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic – October 2017

So much fun.

Published: October 9, 2017

Attending the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic: The Music of John Williams (audio)

This past weekend Eliza and I attended an orchestral presentation by the NEPA Philharmonic that featured musical scores composed by John Williams – my favorite score composer.

Forgive the audio quality, the fact that I forgot to record more than I did, and that at the end I yell “it’s all over” so fast that it is unintelligible. I was quite literally blown away by the presentation. I cried (both at Jurassic Park and during Leia’s theme), I laughed (at the conductor playing the role of Indiana Jones), and my spirits were soaring (during Hook!).

Not my best audio bit so far but definitely my favorite.

Download

Keystone Observatory from above – September 2017

Published: October 6, 2017


Trees, Merli-Sarnoski Park, Carbondale, PA – September 2017

Published: September 25, 2017

Attending September’s NEPA.js meetup

On September 12th, NEPA.js held its September meetup. Anthony Altieri presented on beacons – the typically small Bluetooth devices that “chirp” some very basic information multiple times per second allowing app developers to understand the proximity of a user. This allows for things like understanding where a shopper is in a retail space.

His overview of the devices, the spec, some of the software, and the differences between iOS and Android, and iBeacon and Eddystone – was a really nice introduction into the space. He did a great job.

I learned a lot during his presentation. Thanks to him for putting it together.

If you haven’t yet been to a NEPA.js and you live in our area – I implore you to check one out. It is consistently attended, always fun, and isn’t always focused solely on JavaScript. But even if it was, it is worth your time.

Jason Washo interviewed on tecBRIDGE Radio

Jason Washo, owner of Sho Technology Solutions in downtown Scranton and someone who I’ve worked with on multiple client projects and who has become a friend over the last year, was recently interviewed on tecBRIDGE Radio.

Here’s just one bit:

I work hard, and I will work to bring things to close and I think a lot of people won’t do that. Getting something 80% of the way there is easy but bringing it to 100% I think is one the hardest parts. That is something I’m committed to.

Jason’s interview exudes positivity about our area, good work ethic, and a drive to do a good job. We can all learn from Jason.

Clinton, PA – July 2017

Published: September 11, 2017

Reading Ready Player One, Downtown Scranton – July 2017

Easily my favorite book this year. Eliza just finished it too. I may want to read it again before the movie comes out.

Published: September 7, 2017

Just off Old Mining Road 3, Archbald, PA – June 2017

I haven’t been on a proper hike since July 29 and I’m starting to get the itch.

Published: September 5, 2017

Morning on Penn Avenue, Scranton, PA – August 2017

Published: August 31, 2017

Bank Towers, Scranton, PA – August 2017

Published: August 30, 2017

LEVY, Penn Avenue, Downtown Scranton, PA – August 2017

Published: August 29, 2017

Ben Franklin Techventures, Bethlehem, PA – August 2017

Published: August 28, 2017

The Carbondale Grand Hotel & Conference Center, Carbondale, PA – July 2017

Published: August 25, 2017

Presenting at the August 2017 Lehigh Valley Tech Meetup

The Lehigh Valley Tech Meetup is an excellent community in the Lehigh Valley that meets monthly at the Ben Franklin Technology Partners incubator within the Lehigh University Mountaintop campus. The community around the meetup is excellent and the building is amazing*.

While the tail-end of my presentation walked through my experience building my first iOS app Summit, the majority of my presentation was focused on helping early stage companies think about their go to market strategies.

I’m currently advising several companies, a few of which are businesses built around mobile apps, and have heard about 11 other start-up pitches this year so far. And during that time I’ve noticed a trend. Entrepreneurs that are attempting to build a business around an app sometimes underestimate the amount of thought that should go into the marketing and sales strategy for the app. It is as if some feel that apps are less thought and work than products that you can touch. So during my presentation at LVTech I hoped to convey that the same “boring” (yet, tried and true) business practices that apply to products also apply to software.

A few questions I urged those thinking about building a business around an app were:

  • Does your idea service a large enough segment of the market? We hear the “scratch your own itch” mantra a lot. However, it won’t always lead to finding hundreds, thousands, or tens of thousands of customers.
  • How will you reach those customers?
  • Are there ways to expand your idea into other products or services that can be sold to the same segment?
  • How will you sell or package your idea?
  • What will the price be? (free, one-time payment, subscription, service contracts)
  • What channels can you leverage to sell your idea? (App Store, retail, online, conferences, distributorships, via a sales force)

By considering these, and may other questions, you can determine if your idea has enough layers to support an entire business or if you just have an app idea**.

I also briefly discussed three misconceptions I’ve been seeing over the last year dealing with very early stage start-ups. These misconceptions were:

  • Press-based launch strategies: some thing that by being covered by press will be enough to get them to profitability. They have no other strategy. On the contrary, getting press coverage early on will give you very muddy analytics which will make decision marking very difficult. Very seldom are the tech audience your real customers.
  • How long until profitablilty: More and more entrepreneurs begin with the plan of losing money for 3 or more years. I believe this stems from press coverage of other companies getting large rounds of funding. Most businesses should strive for profitability within the first quarter or year of business.
  • ”I’m not technical, I need a technical co-founder”: Don’t be this person. Anyone can learn to code. Geeks are not smarter than you. They’re just interested and relentless. Be the same.

We then did about 10 minutes or so of questions and answers. The questions I got were really great and I appreciate all those in attendance helping me with the answers to the questions I didn’t have much experience in.

Thanks to Tim Lytle for the invitation to speak and to Ben Franklin Technology Partners for the continued support.

* I worked in this same building for years while at Viddler. But when I worked there the back half of the building didn’t exist. In fact, Viddler started in Jordan Hall – the building just beside the new building. And now, they are extending it even further. The building is an amazing place to work and have a meetup of this kind. I’m jealous that our incubator in Scranton feels so dated when compared to this building. Especially comparing the meeting spaces.

** It it totally fine to “just have an app idea”. I do. And I’m loving working on it. But it is also good to have the proper perspective about your app idea.