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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

“My Fares” by Joseph Rodriguez

Joseph Rodriguez:

It was not unusual to see shoe-shiners outside of Grand Central. They’re not there anymore. I think it’s a Banana Republic now.

Incredible photo portfolio backed with incredible stories.

/via Kottke.

Benmarl Winery, Marlboro, New York – September 2017

It was a gorgeous September day to enjoy a bottle of wine overlooking the Hudson Valley. See also.

Published: October 4, 2017


Newburgh Brewing Company, Newburgh New York – September 2017

Recommended. Great brews, space, branding, view.

Published: October 1, 2017

Hudson River, Newburgh, New York – August 2017

On a recent weekend trip Eliza and I ate BBQ on the Hudson. It was a gorgeous weekend in the Hudson River Valley area.

Published: August 15, 2017

Benmarl Winery – April 2017

This winery has a beautiful view over the Hudson River valley.

Published: June 9, 2017

Aerial photos of a few wineries

In late April Eliza and I took a weekend day drive to visit some wineries in the tristate area of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. We wanted to visit a few wineries we had never been to before and the beauty of that region alone is worth the drive.

We both take tons of photos on days like this but for a change I thought I’d take a photo of each winery we visited with my drone. I didn’t know how this would work out logistically – would the wineries let me, would it be a pain to do, would it take too long and put a damper on our day? It turns out none of my fears were founded. It was super easy to do (with some initial set up) and the results came quickly and easily.

Here are the aerial photos along with my personal ratings of the wineries.

Belmarl Winery and Vineyard – ★★★★★

Brotherhood Winery – ★★★★☆

Demarest Hill Winery – ☆☆☆☆☆ (sorry, it was terrible)

Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery – ★★☆☆☆ (region worth visit, spirits are not)

Now that you’ve seen the photos, I’ll give you a quick rundown of how I prepared so that taking these photos wouldn’t ruin our day. Before we left I set up the drone and my small take-off table in the trunk of the car ready to fly. Props attached, batteries in, bag unzipped. The only thing I needed to do at each winery was find a safe place to fly, turn the drone on, take a photo or two, land, and turn the drone off. I focused on only taking two or three photos of each winery. So I chose my angle, flew to a decent height, took my shot and left. These were only for my own personal collection anyway. My guess is that my longest flight was 5 minutes long.

This idea of looking at things slightly differently using the drone fits my principle of having an excuse to explore.

I wouldn’t change much about my technique here. And it likely seems like an odd thing to obsess over. But, I’m satisfied with the shots (they are photos that I never would have if it wasn’t for owning a drone) and my set up. I hope to do this again on similar jaunts.

Callicoon Brewing Company – April 2017

Published: April 20, 2017

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Empire State Building from Herald Square, New York City – November 2011

Published: November 5, 2016

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Brooklyn New York – August 2014

Published: October 28, 2016

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Grimaldi’s, Brooklyn, NY – March 2014

Published: October 17, 2016

Vestal New York

Vestal, New York – June 2016.

Published: July 1, 2016

Milanville Bridge New York

Milanville Bridge, New York, March 2016

Published: June 3, 2016

Herman J. Weimer Vineyard, February 2016

Published: May 18, 2016

Keuka Lake, February 2016

Published: April 13, 2016

Western Hotel, Callicoon, NY, March 2016

Published: March 29, 2016

Delaware River, Milanville, NY, March 2016 – From the Callicoon Photo Adventure.

Published: March 28, 2016

Breakfast nook, Keuka Lake, Penn Yan, New York, February 2015

Published: March 23, 2016

The Dancing Cat Saloon, Bethel, New York, August 2015

Published: March 17, 2016

Geese on White Lake, New York

Published: March 8, 2016

You should go to meetups

Last night I joined Kyle Ruane, Michael O’Boyle, and Bruno Galvao and drove two-and-a-half hours to Brooklyn — simply to attend a small tech meetup.

If you’ve been subscribed to my blog for any amount of time you’ve probably seen that I go to a lot of meetups, even some that are 12 hours away, and I’ve had the privilege of presenting at some of them. Why? Why make a long drive for a 1-hour tech meetup just to turn around and drive home?

Because there is a lot of energy at meetups. The presenters are generally at the beginning of their product cycles and they have a lot of positive energy to make something happen. Those in the crowd all have their stories, their ideas, their goals. And, in addition to those building startups you’ll generally find lawyers, venture capitalists, programmers, marketers, etc. who are willing to offer their help for your project. It is a very, very good way to meet people that you’ll likely work with.

I can’t recommend going to meetups enough. Even if they are a little out of your way. It will be worth it in the long run. Also, it will help you with your echo chamber.

Oh, and just for posterity, last night the presentations at the Brooklyn Tech Meetup were done by the following companies:

  • JackPocket – A new way to play the lottery.
  • Chatwala – A 10-second video messaging app.
  • Rukkus – Quick, cheap way to buy event tickets.

The Brooklyn Tech Meetup is simple, fast, and well attended. I recommend.