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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

Follow: @c2dev2, RSS, JSON, Micro.blog.

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Matt Haughey and I disagree about Instagram Stories

Matt Haughey, on this blog:

Instagram stories feel like work, like being forced to watch ads from my friends’ lives instead of casually browse stuff at my own pace. The feed: I can just scroll through quickly, and stop on interesting photos, but Stories slow down the whole process of popping into Instagram for just a moment.

Also? I understand it’s better to give people the right to forget their work, but when a true pro photographer does stories of their previous day with breathtaking shots, it makes me sad I can’t share those with others since they’re going poof in 24 hours.

Lastly, not being able to like or send some minor signal of support feels missing from Stories. I can only send them a DM, which feels invasive. I often want to send someone a congratulatory way to go! but sending them a direct message feels like too much contact.

I still like the main instagram, even though I can’t sort it by last uploaded and can’t pay to get all those ads removed, but I’m still tepid on Stories.

He and I disagree. We talked about it briefly on Mastodon. I understand his point of view. However, I really like Instagram Stories. I like making them. And I like watching them. For a good example of Stories take a look at my friend Dan Rubin.

Matt Haughey on the mobile WordPress app

Matt Haughey vents his frustrations with WordPress:

Over the past week I’ve written a bunch of posts while out and about using the iOS WordPress app, often with photos of things I was seeing. But unless I was on WiFi or had 5 bars of LTE connectivity, I would get a Posting Failed, Retry? message. The wild thing is even after hitting retry a bunch, it would still fail. And then if I flicked over to my draft posts folder, the post wasn’t there. If I didn’t keep retrying and instead clicked anywhere in the app, the post would disappear completely.

Like Haughey, I too am frustrated with the WordPress mobile app (I’m on Android, and I have the same issues). I’ve actually removed WordPress from my phone because I can’t use it. It simply doesn’t work well at all. If I even try do post my photo posts with it crashes over and over and over and over. Which is why you’ve seen a lot less photos from me.

Keeping a record of your thoughts and media and owning it

Go ahead and read Matt Haughey’s post on why he left Twitter. But I wanted to pull out this bit:

I didn’t like that everything I wrote ended up being hard to find or reference, and even hard for me to pull up myself when I wanted, where a blog makes it pretty dang easy to see everything you wrote about in the past.

If I’m analyzing my reasons for blogging and/or microblogging on my own domain this is likely #1. I love having a history of my thoughts, guesses, observations, and photos. And I love that I own it.

So Brent is done and so is Matt. Even if all of us very early Twitter power users (I was user 10,000 or so) left Twitter it wouldn’t matter to them at all. Brent is correct. Saying Twitter is bad is better said with your feet than your fingers. I rarely tweet these days and write here much more. I think I’ll continue for 30 more years at least.

Matt Haughey “Communication is the hardest part”

Matt Haughey at the January DonutJS meetup in Portland, Oregon:

Being able to express myself is something I’ve worked on my whole life.

I’m constantly learning this lesson both personally and professionally. Each time I do the “landing” of it is softer and softer as I get older. But if someone isn’t “getting me” it is likely because I am not communicating properly.

Great presentation by Matt. I’m very glad for the internet as I wasn’t in Portland for DonutJS.

/via Aaron Parecki.

Experiment more

Try new things with what you already have.

In 2006 I wrote a post about taking full advantage of the things you already own. Knowing every feature of your SLR or Bluray player or getting to know the features of your most-used software.

In this post I want to encourage you to try something completely new with something you use regularly. Experiment. Push. Flip over. Pull. Spin. Tilt.

This is how panoselfies were born. And look what happened there. Many people have a pano mode on their phone. How many point it at themselves?

Experimentation has led to some game-changing discoveries. Heat. Gmail. Electricity.

Take something you use every day. Take a good long look at it. Now, try something completely different with it. It might be fun. And, maybe, just maybe, it might be useful.

Haughey introduces the Panoselfie

Matt Haughey on Medium:

After seeing the first couple panoselfies Colin made, I became immediately enamored with the idea.

You can see #panoselfies are picking up a bit.

Haughey hangs it up at MetaFilter

Matt Haughey, matthowie, had an incredible 16 year run with Metafilter. And, in true Mefi fashion… the post about his departure drips with just the right amount of MetaFilter-isms:

LobsterMitten is returning as a full-time moderator

All yours LobsterMitten.

Slow reading email

Matt Haughey writing on this #tildeclub space:

One long-standing pet peeve with Gmail (and all similar email apps) is that they don’t offer a “slow” reading option. Email is a fast, efficient, intensive sort of activity, so the UI is as practical as possible, but if I ever need to write more than four paragraphs, I find myself often composing text in Google Docs or even Medium draft posts, both that get shared as a link over email. I know how much I don’t like reading tons of text in an email interface so I purposely push them to a place with larger fonts, more comfortable margins, and a way to soak in the words in a calmer UI. Go read stuff over there, where words are respected properly instead of your punch-clock email machine here.

What a great idea! I could never begin to count the number of times I’ve read “Sorry this email is so long”, or something to that effect, in an email. I don’t know why people appologize. I love long emails (well, the ones with a purpose for being long). But he’s right, reading them in most email clients is a fairly poor experience.

The golden age for independent content

Matthew Haughey waxing nostalgic on the incredibly retro tilde.club:

That made me think back to posting 4–5 times a day on my own blog, and RSS (and The Time Before Google Reader Was Killed), and even back before that. I tried to think of the ultimate time for the indie web, when I was experiencing my favorite setup during the early days.

There is some amazing stuff going on over at tilde. I think it will be somewhat short lived but I’m soaking it all in while it lasts. Follow #tildeclub on Twitter to see the antics.

Side note: Matthew has a very nice blog. Maybe he should use that? Like Andy is?