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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

Mirage

Mirage:

A world living on top of reality.

I played around with the app this afternoon. It is very rough. Super frustrating to try and use. But I sincerely hope they continue to pull this thread. I hope to see a lot more of this type of thing over the next 36 months.

/via Andy Baio.

Colin Walker on blogrolls

Colin Walker:

Part of the problem with people based following models on social networks is that you follow the whole person so see everything they post whether it is relevant to you or not. There is no filtering system.

He goes on to mention that blogrolls that also supply an OPML file make it quick to subscribe via RSS to all of the blogs in the roll. Then, that person can determine whether or not to keep each subscription based on the value they get from them.

I can see that. But, I still go back to my original thought on this. If I subscribe to a bunch of blogs (and I do) and then I link to individual posts that I think are interesting, then I’m acting as a curator for my subscribers. This is why Kottke, Daring Fireball, and Waxy are so popular. They highlight some of the most interesting content, discussions, or resources they’ve found on the web. I do not intend to try to be as focused as Daring Fireball or as prolific as Kottke, but if I find something interesting I enjoy linking to them and giving my thoughts. If I really think something is worth discussing then I will link to it in an individual post.

If you subscribe to my blog and notice I’m routinely linking to a particular source (like Colin Walker) you may consider hopping over to your nearest feed reader and subscribing to his site as well.

Walker also mentions that anecdotal evidence suggests that people using RSS or JSON Feed to subscribe to blogs is on the rise. I’m seeing that too. And I’m very happy about it.

Upcoming.org is back

Andy Baio:

In September 2003, I opened Upcoming.org to the public. And now, 4,941 days later, four years after Yahoo shut it down and deleted everything, Upcoming.org is back — thanks to you.

I’ve been waiting for this since last June. I have the feeling this version will be around a very, very long time. Go grab your account and set up some events. I did.

Upcoming.org Archive

Andy Baio has resurrected a massive amount of Upcoming.org’s first 10 years of event data:

This is a static historical archive more than 7 million events saved from Upcoming’s first ten years. The vast majority of events were saved, and the original URLs for nearly all of them are active again — along with the original venue, watchlist, and comment metadata.

Just to show my age, yes, I had a profile in 2007. Many of those events had such a huge impact on how I view the web.

I’m looking forward to the new Upcoming.org.

Blogging is back

I’m loving loving loving this.

Andy Baio:

So I think I‘ll try doing the same thing here. In the early days of Waxy.org, before I launched the linkblog, I used to blog short posts constantly. Multiple times a day. Twitter and Waxy Links cannibalized all the smaller posts, and as my reach grew, I started reserving blogging for more “serious“ stuff — mostly longer-form research and investigative writing.

So, to recap – we have many people that have come back to blogging far more regularly. People that used to but sort of stopped. People that were tweeting rather than blogging. People that went into professional journalism due to their blogging. People that rarely blogged but are starting to see the delight in it.

I’d link to them all here but I suggest parsing through the archives here and seeing what has been going on over the last few months.

Blogging is back.