Things I saw this week #2: August 30, 2013

This has been a busy week. We’ve just turned on the sales engine at Barley and it has been interesting to go out and talk to potential new customers, resellers, and partners. Even with this busy week, though, I managed to find some interesting things on the web. Here are some of them. I’m on vacation next week so next week’s list may be light. Enjoy!

Blue and Yellow by Kyle Steed.
Photo: Blue and Yellow by Kyle Steed.

A List of Blocked Hashtags on Instagram – The list consists of a bunch of hashtags that make total sense but I don’t know why iPhone or iPhone4s would be blocked.

Where “tip” was coined – Perhaps, maybe, probably the term “tip” came from coffeehouses in 1690 wherein they had a box on the counter that was there “To Insure Promptness”.

Shoeshining still a thing on Wall Street – When Kyle and I were in Brooklyn last week we happened upon a shoeshining station or two that were completely empty. Not this one on Wall Street it seems.

Andrew Kim reviews the Nokia Lumia 1020 – Now our Lumia 920 at work looks like a brick. If only Windows Phone had apps.

Keycodes – Pretty sweet way to figure out Unicode chars.

Leonardo Da Vinci applies for a job – “I can construct bridges which are very light and strong and [..] I can also burn and destroy those of the enemy.”

An interview with Jerry Seinfeld – He’s digging the Internet. If you haven’t seen Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee yet, take a few minutes and watch an episode or two.

Deconstructing the Dribbble dream – People are hard on Dribbble as a community. I really do not think that those that complain about Dribbble are using Dribbble for its intended purpose. But, like any online community full of user generated content, the community makes the product.

Where Bloggers Blog – A collection of photos of where people write their blogs. I’ll have to submit my desk at Plain Space soon.

David Lewandowski’s GFX work on Oblivion – We watched Oblivion at a screening in Plain Space and the effects work in the film is stunning. /via him on Twitter.

Graphic: Computer tree – This graphic shows the branches of computer systems from 1945-1960s. Do you know where your computer’s system originated? /via Aphyr.

Video: Volvo Concept Coupe – Interesting direction for Volvo. Pretty slick. /via Jason Fried on Twitter.

The best way to delete code – Ned Batchelder says keep it simple; to delete code just delete code. Use git too, of course.

A list of free programming books via Creative Commons – It is a pretty extensive list. If you ever wanted to read one of these books now you can, for free.

The new – If you’re using Google Chrome check this site out to see what is possible using WebGL and a sprinkle of other bleeding-edge web technologies to make a site come alive.