Reverse engineer. Blogger.

Posts tagged php

In 2009 I scrawled together a simple PHP script that tweeted links based on an RSS feed. I then updated it to support OAuth and open sourced it on GitHub. I haven’t really touched it since (though I get about 3 emails a month about it). Just a small update here and there. This morning, […]

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Hacking rather than waiting

Yesterday afternoon Sarah Pressler retweeted Jono Young’s request for a plugin that would add a submenu to the WordPress’ Admin with the current pages for the site under the Pages menu. This would reduce the number of clicks to get to the page editor. I was waiting for an upload to finish and I thought, given the code […]

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Need something like this? Consider hiring me for your next project. I was recently asked by a client if I could use an existing Excel spreadsheet and create a single-page web site from it. This way, their team would be able to use the work they’ve already done and the data they’ve already keyed in and wouldn’t need […]

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If you find yourself needing something like this, why not hire me to make it for you? A friend of mine somewhat recently became a licensed realtor. One thing that surprised him was the lack of technology being used in his workplace. Though not a technologist himself, he enjoys an efficient workflow such as using a […]

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One of my recent client programming projects (hire me here) was to help a company migrate all customers, cards, plans, and subscriptions from one Stripe account to another as a result of an acquisition. I hadn’t needed to do anything like this in the past and I ended up fumbling my way through a few […]

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PHP is pretty bad

Since I wrote “I’m perfectly happy using PHP” last week I figured I’d show the other side’s viewpoint as well. There are those out there that loathe the language. Evee goes off on PHP like no one else could:

Her analogy to a toolbox full of tools that you can’t really use properly is apt. I do feel like I write a lot of workarounds for things. I’ve always thought it was due to the depth of my knowledge of the language. Perhaps it isn’t. Perhaps it is indicative of it.

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I had Unmark’d Kyle Slattery’s post on his company site (which I think is rather good looking; here is why) regarding why his company uses Ruby on Rails. It is a good post. Notice this bit:

Bingo. By the time I finish editing this post seventeen more frameworks, libraries, or pseudo-languages will have been released. And honestly, that is fantastic. Because out of those a few will take off, be well supported, and become great utilities for future projects to benefit from.

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RSS to Twitter using PHP

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Update January 19, 2010: This script is now available on GitHub. Go forth and fork.

Today I noticed that my now ancient PHP script to update Twitter automatically using PHP/cron needed to be updated. It turns out that Twitter stopped recognizing URLs with ? in them as clickable links. Here is an example tweet where you’ll notice this happening.

I could have told Twitter and asked that they update the way they handle URLs but in reality my script was old, slow, too long, and shouldn’t include ? anyway so I figured I’d write a new one from scratch that included my short URL scheme.

So, here is the PHP script to parse an RSS feed and send the posts to Twitter. It includes a caching mechanism so that you won’t have duplicate URLs posted to Twitter. If you want it, take it. However, if you are better than I am at PHP (most 6yr. olds are better than I am at programming) then I ask that you fork the script on Gist and try to improve it.

Update Dec. 6 @ 5:34p: Kyle Slattery, follow Viddler team member, loves him some Ruby on Rails. As such he’s offered up this version of the script rewritten in Ruby.

Next up we have Anthony Sterling, self-proclaimed “PHP addict”, who has rewritten the script to make the configuration a bit easier. He also changed the way the cache is saved. He’s using a hashed version of the title for each post as his key. I do not believe this to be the best way to go, since post titles can easily change after publishing – but I do like that the script is about 20 lines shorter and the code is arguably cleaner.

Thanks to both Kyle and Anthony for their versions. Lets keep this going and see if we can get this script much more succinct, stable, faster, and usable by others?

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