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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

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Microsoft releases Edge on iOS and Android

Joe Belfiore:

Introducing Microsoft Edge for iOS/Android and Microsoft Launcher for Android, two apps designed to make it easy to move what you’re working on between your phone and PC.

Great move. Likely tons of Surface users that also have iPhones and definitely have Android devices.

The Launcher is an interesting move. I’m anxious to see if they continue to improve it. Facebook made one years ago and gave up on it in very short order.

Please turn on Do Not Disturb When Driving!

Jason Snell for Six Colors:

iPhone users, well, there’s still great stuff there—Do Not Disturb When Driving is going to make the world safer—but it’s a bit less of a world-shaker.

Not a world shaker? This isn’t a ho-hum, hum-drum update for iPhone. This is going to save a ton of lives, injury, heartache, and money. I wish every single review led with strong advice to turn this feature on immediately.

I cannot stress enough that people turn this feature on today. Please please please.

Tom Dale: “Compilers are the new frameworks”

Tom Dale, Senior Staff Software Engineer at LinkedIn and co-creator of Ember.js, in a post where he argues that compilers are the new web frameworks:

Native code tends to have the luxury of not really caring about file size—a small 40MB iOS app would get you laughed out of the room on the web. And AAA game titles accept minutes-long load times in exchange for consistent 60fps performance, but I shudder to think what a 30 second load time would do to the conversion rate of your e-commerce site, 60fps or not.

While I agree with most of his post, that compilers are becoming increasingly more a part of a web developers workflow and thus becoming very important to learn, this particular bit isn’t a fair one-to-one comparison in my opinion.

Web apps do not need to pre-load every single asset onto the device prior to running. If you were to weigh a fully native app next to its counterpart web app* you’d likely get a very similar result. It is just that a native app is downloaded mostly all at once and a web app can be loaded as needed.

But his point remains, more and more web apps are looking more like native apps. They are compiled, loaded, and completely obfuscated from the source code they originally started out at. I’m not sure if I feel this is good or bad for the web. But I do know that the barrier to entry in web development is higher than ever.

* Most web apps that have a direct counterpart on a mobile platform share lots, if not all, code these days so these comparisons are getting tougher and tougher to do fairly.

E19: Launching Summit’s public beta

Recorded on August 23 2017.

A quickly captured audio bit while walking to get a coffee the day after launching Summit’s public beta.

Download MP3.

Pedometer++ 3.0

_DavidSmith:

I’ve been steadily working on Pedometer++ now for nearly four years. Over that time the core conceit of the app has remained the same, to motivate you to be more active. It has done this with colors, confetti, complications and streaks. Now I’ve added another tool to hopefully motivate, achievements!

Pedometer++ continues to be my favorite step counter*. I’m looking forward to trying out this latest release.

* Yes, I’m building Summit, but that doesn’t mean I won’t still use Pedometer++ and Map My Walk. Each of these apps play a different role. I hope to make Summit good enough to fill a role for others too. But not the same role as Pedometer++. Even though the number one feature request is that I add more stats – that isn’t what Summit is about.

Colin Walker on the Summit beta

Colin Walker:

I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the time I’ve spent beta testing Summit and look forward to the new builds.

Colin has provided excellent feedback on Summit. So have so many of the beta testers. I too am looking forward to publishing new builds.

If you’re on the beta list (which you can get on by putting your email address in the form on this page) and you haven’t gotten Build 15 yet – please let me know. Build 16 is due mid-September.

Presenting at the August 2017 Lehigh Valley Tech Meetup

The Lehigh Valley Tech Meetup is an excellent community in the Lehigh Valley that meets monthly at the Ben Franklin Technology Partners incubator within the Lehigh University Mountaintop campus. The community around the meetup is excellent and the building is amazing*.

While the tail-end of my presentation walked through my experience building my first iOS app Summit, the majority of my presentation was focused on helping early stage companies think about their go to market strategies.

I’m currently advising several companies, a few of which are businesses built around mobile apps, and have heard about 11 other start-up pitches this year so far. And during that time I’ve noticed a trend. Entrepreneurs that are attempting to build a business around an app sometimes underestimate the amount of thought that should go into the marketing and sales strategy for the app. It is as if some feel that apps are less thought and work than products that you can touch. So during my presentation at LVTech I hoped to convey that the same “boring” (yet, tried and true) business practices that apply to products also apply to software.

A few questions I urged those thinking about building a business around an app were:

  • Does your idea service a large enough segment of the market? We hear the “scratch your own itch” mantra a lot. However, it won’t always lead to finding hundreds, thousands, or tens of thousands of customers.
  • How will you reach those customers?
  • Are there ways to expand your idea into other products or services that can be sold to the same segment?
  • How will you sell or package your idea?
  • What will the price be? (free, one-time payment, subscription, service contracts)
  • What channels can you leverage to sell your idea? (App Store, retail, online, conferences, distributorships, via a sales force)

By considering these, and may other questions, you can determine if your idea has enough layers to support an entire business or if you just have an app idea**.

I also briefly discussed three misconceptions I’ve been seeing over the last year dealing with very early stage start-ups. These misconceptions were:

  • Press-based launch strategies: some thing that by being covered by press will be enough to get them to profitability. They have no other strategy. On the contrary, getting press coverage early on will give you very muddy analytics which will make decision marking very difficult. Very seldom are the tech audience your real customers.
  • How long until profitablilty: More and more entrepreneurs begin with the plan of losing money for 3 or more years. I believe this stems from press coverage of other companies getting large rounds of funding. Most businesses should strive for profitability within the first quarter or year of business.
  • ”I’m not technical, I need a technical co-founder”: Don’t be this person. Anyone can learn to code. Geeks are not smarter than you. They’re just interested and relentless. Be the same.

We then did about 10 minutes or so of questions and answers. The questions I got were really great and I appreciate all those in attendance helping me with the answers to the questions I didn’t have much experience in.

Thanks to Tim Lytle for the invitation to speak and to Ben Franklin Technology Partners for the continued support.

* I worked in this same building for years while at Viddler. But when I worked there the back half of the building didn’t exist. In fact, Viddler started in Jordan Hall – the building just beside the new building. And now, they are extending it even further. The building is an amazing place to work and have a meetup of this kind. I’m jealous that our incubator in Scranton feels so dated when compared to this building. Especially comparing the meeting spaces.

** It it totally fine to “just have an app idea”. I do. And I’m loving working on it. But it is also good to have the proper perspective about your app idea.

Summit – The Adventurous Step Counter

This evening, at a presentation at the Lehigh Valley Tech Meetup, I’m opening up public beta access to my new iOS app, Summit – The Adventurous Step Counter.

I’ve stitched together a temporary web site for the app as well as a mailing list that will allow you to get access to the final few beta builds prior to public release. If you have an iPhone please consider signing up and giving it a spin. I’d be very grateful for your feedback.

Thanks to the 13 private beta testers who have already tested the app and provided feedback. You can expect a brand-new build of the app coming in September.

What is Summit?

Summit is a free, iOS-only app that uses your step count to virtually hike up tall peaks like Mount Everest in Nepal, learn about amazing landmarks like Diamond Head in Oahu, and even take a leisurely stroll down famous streets like Lombard Street in San Francisco. As you make progress on your journey you’re provided new information at each goal.

At the time of public release there will be 5 summits and new summits will be added each month thereafter.

Here are some screenshots of the app as it is currently:

When I started on Summit I did not know how to develop an iOS app. It has been really fun to learn Swift, Xcode, iTunes Connect and Test Flight, and the myriad other things I was able to learn in order to get this app as far as I have.

I still have a bit of work to do, but I’d love your feedback along the way as I finish the app up for release.

Mirage

Mirage:

A world living on top of reality.

I played around with the app this afternoon. It is very rough. Super frustrating to try and use. But I sincerely hope they continue to pull this thread. I hope to see a lot more of this type of thing over the next 36 months.

/via Andy Baio.

I can work on anything I want

One of the most enjoyable aspects of working on your own project is that there is so much to do. That may seem strange, why would I want to have so much to do? But if you look at it a different way it becomes a much more enjoyable experience.

Whenever I sit down to work on my pet project, a new iOS app, I can choose what I’m in the mood to work on. Perhaps I’m in the mood to work on the branding, editorial, licensing, or marketing? Or, would I prefer to hunker down into some Swift programming and refine the datastore, algorithms, animations, speed, etc of the app? Or perhaps I’d like to identify key strategic partners for my product launch or look through beta user feedback or do some artwork?

You see the point? Yes, there is a lot to do. And it can seem overwhelming if you allow it to be. But, no matter what type of mood I’m in I can make some progress on the project nearly every single day. And I’m having a ball so far.