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Colin Devroe

Photographer. Podcaster. Blogger. Reverse Engineer.

Marcus Peddle on using film or digital

Marcus Peddle, remarking on making Jim Grey’s aforementioned list of film photography blogs:

I’m honoured, but slightly embarrassed because most of my photography these days is digital. Still, a photo is a photo, right? I hope you won’t be disappointed by the paucity of film photographs if you came to this website by following the link from Jim’s list.

I understand Marcus’ humble acknowledgement here but it is crappy that anyone should defend what they choose to shoot photos with. A photographer should be able to use whatever tool she/he would prefer to use for any given project or at any given moment and they should never have to apologize for it.

His point is more so that he made a list of film photography blogs and isn’t sharing much about film photography lately. But, you can still read between the lines when he says “a photo is a photo, right?”. Right!!

Personally I use a myriad of “cameras”. A incomplete list of cameras that I currently use regularly are a drone, my iPhone, the Canon AE-1 Program, my now 14 year old Canon Digital Rebel XTi DSLR, an ancient Ansco Speedex, paper negatives shoved into just about any contraption I can find, MY BEDROOM, point and shoot cameras, and many many many more.

I hope everyone on that excellent film photography blog list does the same and shares what they make.

I need to share more photos and will soon.

One-Picture-Promise

Rick Sammon, in a piece for Peta Pixel on Seeing, describes the One-Picture-Promise:

When you are in a situation, imagine you only have one frame remaining on your memory card, and you can take only one picture. If you think like this, I make you this promise: You will have a more creative photograph. What’s more, during a photo outing, you will have a higher percentage of creative photographs and fewer outtakes.

Great advice. I chat about this topic of taking few frames as opposed to shooting many repeatedly in my podcast.

I believe there is a balance. If you approach photography as Sammon does you’ll slow down, compose far more purposefully, be sure of your camera settings, and likely create fewer but more accurate photographs. On the other hand, digital tools and processes have afforded the photographer the luxury of capturing many attempts to get an interesting photo at little to no more cost than capturing a single image. There is balance somewhere in the middle.

The subject of the photograph also should be taken into account. If you’re photographing humming birds, for instance, you’d likely need to fire off far more captures than if you were photographing a tree in a meadow.

This topic will resurface a lot in 2020 in my podcast as I will be shooting a lot of film – yes, film – in the new year. I’m super excited about it and I can’t wait to share that part of my photographic journey.