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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

Brad Frost on “full-stack developers”

Brad Frost:

The term “full-stack developer” implies that a developer is equally adept at both frontend code and backend code, but I’ve never in my personal experience witnessed anyone who truly fits that description.

In many of the descriptions I’ve seen it goes even further than that. Sometimes full-stack developer refers to someone who can also administer server architectures or cloud services or do database work.

There are certainly a number of people who can fumble their way through all of these things. I consider myself one of them. But I wouldn’t call myself great or even very good at any one of them. There is nearly no one that is great at all of these things. I’ve only seen perhaps one or two in over 20 years of banging away at this keyboard.

This is also an excellent point from Brad:

Large organizations have the ability to hire specialists, which is why I get so confused why so many companies proudly declare they only hire full-stack developers. Having team members that can own the frontend experience is a good thing. Having team members that can own all things backend is a good thing. Having everyone work together to create successful products is a good thing.

No one should be ashamed that they are very good at one thing and not as good at another. Embrace that fact and become an expert.

Goodbye Google.com

BBC:

Google is adding a personalised Facebook-style news feed to its homepage – Google.com -to show users content they may be interested in before they search.

End of an era.

Spine Magazine

Spine Magazine:

Spine was founded in 2014 by Emma J. Hardy, and covers creative and production aspects of the book publishing industry with a primary focus on book cover design. Its mission is to offer creator insight, long-form stories, product information, and community content for an audience that is highly enthusiastic about books.

The first piece I read on Spine was this interview with Daniel Benneworth-Gray (who has an excellent blog btw) by Suzanna Baird (whom you may remember from the Dribbble Blog Courtside). It won’t be the last piece I read there. I’ve just subscribed.

Colin Walker on macOS software

Colin Walker:

Using OSX can be more intuitive at times but it is visually inconsistent. It may have been through various aesthetic revisions but it can feel old. I think Microsoft has done a better job of enforcing a standard look for applications on the desktop and the Windows design language is now generally more modern.

In the early 2000s when I jumped from Windows to the Mac I felt this very same way … except I was describing the Mac as generally more modern and Windows as visually inconsistent. It is interesting to see a new Mac user’s perspective.

Even today, when I use a Windows 10 computer and click down a few screens I find it terribly inconsistent. I see stuff that looks like Windows 98 to my eyes sometimes. I don’t see that in macOS very often – if at all. But, I can see Walker’s perspective. macOS does feel a little long in the tooth to me too. Not compared to Windows 10 but just that the overall design language is stale. Perhaps High Sierra will spruce things up enough to keep it fresh.

Social Thoughts

Me, in 2011:

I believe the blog format is ready for disruption. Perhaps there doesn’t need to be “the next” WordPress, Tumblr, or Blogger for this to happen. Maybe all we really need is a few pioneers to spearhead an effort to change the way blogs are laid-out on the screen.

I still feel that way over six years later.

Colin Walker has a personal blog he calls Social Thoughts. If you read his most recent few weeks of posts you’ll see that he is toying with several subtleties to how his blog looks and works. Of course he has microblog posts, similar to my statuses, but he also has longer form posts. And he’s struggling with how to show them, how to segregate them into feeds (or not), etc.

Like him I too play around with how my blog looks and works. You can see that in my commit history since my WordPress theme is open source.

Looking at his blog’s front page, however, I think he’s onto some interesting ideas. One example is how each day’s content is separated (like blogs used to be). Another being that he has a small indicator for when there are comments on a post. But my favorite thing is that he’s sharing these little experiments out in the open. I’m looking forward to seeing more.

Looking beyond launch

Jeremy Keith regarding Clearleft’s upcoming rebrand:

I think it’s good to remember that this is the web. I keep telling myself that we’re not unveiling something carved in stone. Even after the launch we can keep making the site better. In fact, if we wait until everything is perfect before we launch, we’ll probably never launch at all.

This is precisely what we thought when we redid Condron Media’s site this week. It is no where near complete. It works. It works on all screen sizes. And it was enough to get started. We plan on releasing new content, updates to the messaging, and even new page layouts each week for many weeks.

On rebranding

Over on our company blog we published our recipe for rebranding a company. Here’s a snippet on how our outsider view is an advantage:

Our suggestions and feedback come with no internal bias, no politics, no fear of losing our jobs, and certainly no fear of sounding stupid. We’re experts at dumb ideas. Out of dumb ideas come fruitful discussions, fun tangents, and exhausting possibilities.

If you need that sorta thing, reach out.

A custom skin for MyFantasyLeague

Kyle Ruane on why he created a custom skin for MyFantasyLeague:

There are things on that page that defy explanation—nested tables driving layout, 8px text, inline styles on everything, five different ‘main’ navigation elements. One big dumpster fire. And this is actually one of the better views in terms of usability.

The power of the open web. If you don’t like something, you can change it.

Instagram’s new look

Ian Spalter, Head of Design at Instagram, on Medium:

The evolution of the community has been inspiring, and we hope that we’ve captured some of the life, creativity, and optimism people bring to Instagram every day. Our hope is that people will see this app icon as a new creative spark — something to have fun with and make their own. We’re excited for where this will take us.

The knee-jerk critiques were flying all over the place yesterday; both online and off. Obviously Ian and his team have had a lot more time with this new icon, and app design, than we have and we should allow it some time to sink in before forming any firm convictions.

My first reaction was that I loved the app design (though I feel some of its personality has been stripped like most iOS 7+ apps) and that the icon will need more time to settle in.

The one piece of context all of us on the outside are missing is what Instagram’s vision for the future is. They likely have an idea for where they’d like their community, application(s), and platform to be in the next 3 to 5 years and I’m sure this re-branding exercise plays into that. So give Instagram a year or so and then see how this new icon sits.

Either way, well done to the team at Instagram for putting something out in the world.