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Colin Devroe

Photographer. Podcaster. Blogger. Reverse Engineer.

Hubble’s Legacy Field

I don’t cover space nearly enough here on my blog. I miss the days of writing Space Bits with my friend Yaron Schoen.

Sometimes announcements of new images of our vast Universe just seem to float by with the deluge of information we’re bombarded with every single day. However, I figured this new image from Hubble worthy of taking the time to note.

The Hubble Legacy Field is yet another unfathomable achievement from that team. In the 90s the Hubble Deep Field showed us thousands of galaxies. It was mind blowing to see so much in one image. In the early 2000s came the Ultra Deep Field images which showed 10,000 galaxies! Then came the eXtreme Deep Field which was a collection of exposures over a 10 year period resulting in a look deep into the Universe’s past by focusing on just a tiny area of the original Deep Field viewport.

Now comes Legacy Field, a 16-year set of 7,500 individual exposures, to show us a wide view of 265,000 galaxies. 265,000 galaxies. Each likely hold billions, perhaps trillions of stars – each likely as big or bigger than our own home star – with countless planets orbiting each.

Only Hubble could accomplish this image. Fascinating stuff. An incredible achievement that took a lot of patience and endurance to pull off.

I wish space research, observation, and exploration had 100-times the funding it does currently.

What I saw this week #57 – February 29, 2019

Don’t have time to get to all of these links today? No problem. Try Unmark (I’ll send you an invite if you’d like.)

Also, there are tons more.

  • Apollo-related stuff: With it being the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo program there is a slew of content surfacing this year. Here are a few things I’ve enjoyed and a few things I’m looking forward to.
  • WWW – the original proposal for what is now the internet.
  • Financial Windfalls – Topic interviewed 15 people about what they did with sudden influxes of cash ranging from a few thousand dollars to huge piles of dough. Interesting read.
  • Why do Zebras have stripes? – I don’t think I would have guessed the reason.
  • Stephen Wolfram’s computer set up – I thought I was bad by being picky. While not nearly as outrageous, this reminds me of Richard Stallman’s rider.
  • 50,000 images of the moon – Composite image of the moon created from 50,000 images. Very cool.
  • The Lion Whisperer – I remember a few GoPro promo videos with Kevin Richardson but I recently came across his channel on YouTube randomly. Fascinating YouTube channel and unbelievably incredible animals.

Reminder: These lists are never exhaustive. And I don’t keep impeccable records. I use Unmark to save most of these but by-and-large I allow some randomness into this process to create these lists.

I’m always looking for interesting things so please feel free to send a few my way if you find something you think I might be interested in.

Curiosity takes a selfie

APOD:

This selfie was compiled from many smaller images — which is why the mechanical arm holding the camera is not visible.

In case you’re not impressed, notice this comment on Reddit by djellison who is Engineering Camera Payload Uplink Lead on Curiosity and Opportunity.

This spacecraft – Opportunity – in a REALLY GOOD day – gets a total downlink to Earth of around 80 Megabits.

That’s 10 Megabytes.

For everything.

Read the rest of his comment.

Cassini dies tomorrow

Lee Billings for Scientific American:

All good things must come to an end.

For NASA’s Cassini orbiter—its fuel dwindling after 13 years exploring Saturn, along with the planet’s sprawling rings and dozens of icy moons—the end will come Friday at 7:55 A.M. Eastern time. That’s when mission planners project radio communications will be lost with the two-ton, bus-size spacecraft as it plunges into the giant planet’s turbulent atmosphere at more than 122,000 kilometers per hour.

What a legacy.

Voyager’s 40th Anniversary

East coasters keep your lunchtime open on Tuesday as NASA is celebrating Voyager’s 40th Anniversary. Check out this description from APOD:

Launched in 1977 on a tour of the outer planets of the Solar System, Voyager 1 and 2 have become the longest operating and most distant spacecraft from Earth. Nearly 16 light-hours from the Sun, Voyager 2 has reached the edge of the heliosphere, the realm defined by the influence of the solar wind and the Sun’s magnetic field. Now humanity’s first ambassador to the Milky Way, Voyager 1 is over 19 light-hours away, beyond the heliosphere in interstellar space. Celebrate the Voyagers’ 40 year journey toward the stars with NASA on September 5.

Interstellar space. So cool.

I look at this achievement a number of ways. I laud the fact that this spacecraft was built over 40 years ago (as was its software) and it is out there still humming along. I’m awed at the distance it has traveled and how far out it currently is. However, I also think that 19-light hours is less “time” than it took me yesterday to get back from the Pacific coast in Mexico via bus, airplanes, and car.

In the future 19-light hours may very well seem like next door. I really hope so.

You know where I’ll be on Tuesday during lunch. Chewing on a sandwich and watching NASA TV.

TRAPPIST-1

The following two sentences encapsulate an incredible feat in the advancement of human discovery:

TRAPPIST-1 is a planetary system, located 12 parsecs away from the Solar system (39 light years), near the ecliptic, within the constellation of Aquarius. Around a star which is 12 times less massive than the Sun and only slightly larger than Jupiter, there are at least seven planets in orbit.

This system has its own domain name; trappist.one — see also, the New York Times, and the paper in Nature.

We live in amazing times.