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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

Doug Lane on Microblogging tone

Doug Lane, on thinking a bit more before publishing on his own site than he would on Twitter or Facebook:

If I let moments of anger or frustration sit for a bit, one of two things will happen. Most likely, I’ll move on to something more meaningful without shoving valueless negativity in anyone else’s face. Or, if something negative is still on my mind after some time has passed, I still have the option to post about it. But it’s likely that whatever I post, even if it’s still negative in tone, will be more thoughtful and constructive than a vent in the moment would have been.

I’ve recently jumped back into the fray. This is something I’ve notice immediately. I’ll post absolute drivel on Twitter whereas I curate and sensor myself far more here on my blog. Though, some of you likely wish I did that a bit more.

It also reminds me of an opinion that I have about Snapchat. I’ve mentioned it in the past. I think that it is totally fine that you feel a bit more free on Twitter or on Snapchat to post things that you may otherwise think are worthy of the bin. Because they are made for that. I actually like having the separation.

Doug Lane’s Micro.blog photo challenge

Doug Lane:

I thought we could start on Saturday (Nov. 11) and go for seven days.

He has a theme for each of the 7 days. I’m in.

Social Thoughts

Me, in 2011:

I believe the blog format is ready for disruption. Perhaps there doesn’t need to be “the next” WordPress, Tumblr, or Blogger for this to happen. Maybe all we really need is a few pioneers to spearhead an effort to change the way blogs are laid-out on the screen.

I still feel that way over six years later.

Colin Walker has a personal blog he calls Social Thoughts. If you read his most recent few weeks of posts you’ll see that he is toying with several subtleties to how his blog looks and works. Of course he has microblog posts, similar to my statuses, but he also has longer form posts. And he’s struggling with how to show them, how to segregate them into feeds (or not), etc.

Like him I too play around with how my blog looks and works. You can see that in my commit history since my WordPress theme is open source.

Looking at his blog’s front page, however, I think he’s onto some interesting ideas. One example is how each day’s content is separated (like blogs used to be). Another being that he has a small indicator for when there are comments on a post. But my favorite thing is that he’s sharing these little experiments out in the open. I’m looking forward to seeing more.

Intro to Micro.blog

Noah Read:

Micro.blog is a social timeline, similar to Twitter, where you can post short snippets of text with links and photos, and converse with others. The biggest difference from most other social networks is where these short posts come from. They come from people’s own websites, where they control the content and can do whatever they like. Micro.blog aggregates its feeds from each member’s personal site and gives people chances to reply and favorite content on the the service.

“people’s own websites” can be their own site powered by whatever they want (WordPress, Squarespace, etc.) But, they can be powered by Micro.blog too as Micro.blog has a blog hosting option built-in.

My status posts are automatically syndicated to Micro.blog for free.

Dreamhost supports Micro.blog

Jonathan LaCour, SVP, Product & Technology at Dreamhost:

We’d like to make it as easy as possible to launch a WordPress-powered microblog on DreamHost that integrates well with Manton’s upcoming Micro.blog service. In order to support that mission, DreamHost is kicking in a $5,000 pledge to the Kickstarter.

Nice move Dreamhost.

The Micro.blog stretch goal

Manton Reece has added a thoughtful stretch goal to Micro.blog’s Kickstarter campaign:

If the Kickstarter reaches $80,000, I will use some of the money to make my very first part-time hire for Micro.blog: a community manager. The community manager will help set the tone for the service, work on documentation and best practices, and be responsible for curation when Safe Replies fails to automatically catch emerging problems.

Safe Replies sounds like something Twitter should have had a long time ago. Run over there and help Manton reach this new goal.

Micro.blog’s iPhone app

Manton Reece recently published an update to Micro.blog’s Kickstarter showing a video demonstration of the iPhone app he’s creating for the service. He mentions a really important point that I think many are missing (as I mentioned just a few moments ago). He says (at 53 seconds into the video):

Now, you can have Micro.blog host a microblog for you. That’s what the paid plan is about that is mentioned in some of the reward tiers on Kickstarter. It is super easy to get started that way. But you can also bring an existing blog. My personal blog, for example, uses WordPress. And so, when I use Micro.blog the iPhone app for the first time it asks me where my WordPress blog is and then I can post directly to my own site.

I’ve been following along with this project since Manton first mentioned it nearly two years ago so I’ve been aware of what he was building. I just don’t think the information on the site or on the Kickstarter has made that clear for people that don’t totally understand the underpinnings of the web. (Though, Micro.blog is arguably be built for those that do.)

The iPhone app looks very nice. Especially for a first public release.

App.net shutting down

Dalton Caldwell:

We envisioned a pool of differentiated, fast-growing third-party applications would sustain the numbers needed to make the business work. Our initial developer adoption exceeded expectations, but that initial excitement didn’t ultimately translate into a big enough pool of customers for those developers.

I’ve been a paying subscriber to App.net for the entire life of the platform (that is, until they cancelled my subscription this week).

When App.net launched many were drawing a line of comparison between it and Twitter. And since this announcement I’m seeing many drawing a line of comparison between App.net and Micro.blog. This isn’t an apples-to-apples comparison.

If you read Dalton’s vision above, it doesn’t read anything at all like Twitter or Micro.blog.

App.net was an API for application developers to build on top of. Yes, something Twitter-like could be build on top of it. But so could so many other things. It had a data storage service, a push notification service, and even a crowd-funding feature called Backer that would, presumably, allow developers to pre-charge for new features for apps.

App.net was a very ambitious platform that, I believe, got pigeon-holed into a Twitter comparison because they created Alpha – a Twitter-like microblogging platform – as a demonstration of their own API. I think this muddied their messaging to the point where most people would describe App.net as a Twitter alternative.

Manton Reece’s forthcoming Micro.blog is not anything at all like App.net. Though, many are confused about Micro.blog similar to how many were confused about App.net. (I’ve had at least three conversations about Micro.blog where people have no idea what it will do.) They are comparing it to Twitter even though Manton doesn’t usually draw that line himself. And I think he will have to find a way to communicate its decentralization and the fact that it will work with your existing blogging platform so it too doesn’t get packaged and framed as simply a Twitter replacement.

Independent microblogging

Manton Reece re: Medium’s recent announcement that they are laying off 1/3rd of their team:

The message is clear. The only web site that you can trust to last and have your interests at heart is the web site with your name on it.

He’s right of course. He has said it a million times. So have I. Like right here. And so have many others.

Manton, by the way, is currently Kickstarting a book and service about independent microblogging. I told you about the service already. Go back his project even though it is very well funded already. This is important stuff.

micro.blog

Manton Reece regarding the forthcoming micro.blog:

Renaming a product before its official launch may not seem like a big deal, but in this case it gives the app a new importance. Just by renaming it, the app feels more ambitious. It forces me to devote more attention to it, which means saying goodbye to some of my other web apps that I can no longer focus on.

I’m glad Manton has found the right name and direction for this service he’s been working on for some time. I’m anxious to see it get out into the public.