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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

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Those who share, receive (or, how to get noticed or get work)

I touched on this topic in 2017 in How do you get work?. But let me just pull one sentence from that post:

The clear way to get work is to share work.

The same thing goes for getting “noticed” if that is something you want or need. You have to put things out into the world, and keep doing so, in order to be noticed, build an audience, or have opportunities come your way.

I have two recent, but altogether very different, examples that come to mind.

One is David Sikabwe. On Twitter he shared a rap he wrote for Frank Sinatra’s Fly Me to the Moon. It has blown up on Twitter and, if you read through his recent tweets as of this writing, you will see he has a flood of attention from some very, very big names. He also has some people sharing new works using his work.

He mentions that he wrote the piece 1 year ago and he had it in his Notes app and simply didn’t share it. Would it have been as big of a hit if he had shared it a year ago? Who knows? But, the point is that he did share and it did get attention and now there is a big possibility this young talent finds his break into the industry (if that is what he wants).

The second example is Timothy Smith with Kickstarting Bokeh (which I previously mentioned). Two years ago he wrote on his blog about his experience being interviewed for a job and ultimately not getting it and feeling self-doubt. In that post he ended it with this:

I’m done letting these insecurities win. I’m done trying to get validation that I shouldn’t need. I’m me and I’m awesome.

And guess what? Now he is putting something out into the world. Giving it a shot. And it is being noticed. Manton Reece mentioned it. He was interviewed on Micro Monday, Ashley Baxter mentioned it, DPReview mentioned it, Jeffrey Zeldman mentioned it, and on and on.

These two examples are just the latest proof that if you put stuff out into the world you will receive attention or work if you are seeking it. It may take time. Sometimes even a long time. But it will never, ever happen if you do not share.

Micro Monday – January 15, 2018: Scott McNulty

My Micro Monday recommendation this week is Scott McNulty.

He’s blogging more, podcasting, sharing his reading reviews, and sharing his weight loss journey. Great inspiration on many levels.

Micro Monday – January 8, 2018: Mike Haynes

Micro.blog has a new thing where each Monday you recommend someone to follow and why. Here is Jean MacDonald, Community Manager at M.b:

We are inaugurating Micro Monday January 8. Inspired by Follow Friday, we want to encourage helpful recommendations rather than lists of accounts to follow. We suggest you make just one recommendation per week. Include a link to the account micro.blog/username to make it easy for people to click and follow, whether they see your recommendation on the Micro.blog timeline or on your blog. We highly recommend you give a short description of the reason for your recommendation. (Include the phrase Micro Monday and you’ll earn a special pin!)

Sounds like fun. Though I don’t like that we feel we have to link to the micro.blog URL*.

This week I’ll recommend Mike Haynes. Mike is active on M.b and is working on an Android client that I’m eager to try out. Here is his web site too.

* I don’t particularly like Micro Monday’s rule of sharing the micro.blog URL (instead of the user’s domain) since I think the entire purpose of Micro.blog is to promote the use of independent platforms. But I’ll follow the rules. I hope the rule shifts in the future to sharing each other’s domain name.