Menu

Colin Devroe

Photographer. Podcaster. Blogger. Reverse Engineer.

Licensing my images

(If I sent you to this page, it is likely because you’re in violation of my license. Please read.)

For the last few years my photos have been licensed as attribution only by a simple statement on the bottom of my web page in my footer. My images get stolen, without credit, a lot.

Since my licensing wasn’t all that official I’ve decided to take a moment to choose a Creative Commons license that I feel affords me to take action against some of those thieves while still maintaining the spirit of how I want to share my work.

So, I’ve chosen the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) license.

This means that:

  • Anyone can use my images for non-commercial purposes for free
  • Anyone that uses my images must provide attribution, or credit, linking back to my web site using my full name
  • Anyone can modify my images for their use but they must also license their modifications using the same license I am using
  • Cannot sell my images, or modifications of my images

I’ve modified my web site to clearly show that my images are licensed this way (see example). Anyone from this date that takes my image and uses them, even as a simple post on social media, without following the terms of this license is going to get a wet willy at the very least.

If you’ve used my photo and haven’t given me credit it is really simple to rectify the situation. Edit your social media post or web site to give clear attribution to me, using my full name, and a link back to my web site.

Thank you.

Facebook will drop the patent clause for React license

Matt Mullenweg:

I am surprised and excited to see the news that Facebook is going to drop the patent clause that I wrote about last week. They’ve announced that with React 16 the license will just be regular MIT with no patent addition. I applaud Facebook for making this move, and I hope that patent clause use is re-examined across all their open source projects.

Interesting outcome. Here is more context.

Matt Mullenweg on Automattic’s use of React

Matt Mullenweg:

I’m here to say that the Gutenberg team is going to take a step back and rewrite Gutenberg using a different library. It will likely delay Gutenberg at least a few weeks, and may push the release into next year.

Automattic will also use whatever we choose for Gutenberg to rewrite Calypso — that will take a lot longer, and Automattic still has no issue with the patents clause, but the long-term consistency with core is worth more than a short-term hit to Automattic’s business from a rewrite.

This is a big blow to React. The framework will still be massively popular and adopted but the number of developers in a thriving ecosystem like Automattic’s products – like WordPress – that now have to move onto something else is a big blow. Automattic’s continued use of React would have meant thousands of jobs for a long number of years.

As usual, Mullenweg sees the longterm angle, and weighs that against the core principles upon which his company was founded, and I believe he’s taking the right path.

Side note: I still see so many developers that deal with WordPress day-to-day that haven’t yet started learning JavaScript in earnest. Mullenweg himself has urged the WordPress community for the last several years to invest in learning JavaScript. So, if you haven’t already… jump in.