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Colin Devroe

Photographer. Podcaster. Blogger. Reverse Engineer.

Facebook will drop the patent clause for React license

Matt Mullenweg:

I am surprised and excited to see the news that Facebook is going to drop the patent clause that I wrote about last week. They’ve announced that with React 16 the license will just be regular MIT with no patent addition. I applaud Facebook for making this move, and I hope that patent clause use is re-examined across all their open source projects.

Interesting outcome. Here is more context.

Matt Mullenweg on Automattic’s use of React

Matt Mullenweg:

I’m here to say that the Gutenberg team is going to take a step back and rewrite Gutenberg using a different library. It will likely delay Gutenberg at least a few weeks, and may push the release into next year.

Automattic will also use whatever we choose for Gutenberg to rewrite Calypso — that will take a lot longer, and Automattic still has no issue with the patents clause, but the long-term consistency with core is worth more than a short-term hit to Automattic’s business from a rewrite.

This is a big blow to React. The framework will still be massively popular and adopted but the number of developers in a thriving ecosystem like Automattic’s products – like WordPress – that now have to move onto something else is a big blow. Automattic’s continued use of React would have meant thousands of jobs for a long number of years.

As usual, Mullenweg sees the longterm angle, and weighs that against the core principles upon which his company was founded, and I believe he’s taking the right path.

Side note: I still see so many developers that deal with WordPress day-to-day that haven’t yet started learning JavaScript in earnest. Mullenweg himself has urged the WordPress community for the last several years to invest in learning JavaScript. So, if you haven’t already… jump in.

Mobile blogging goals (audio)

Recorded September 10, 2017

Starting with this audio bit I’m making a few changes.

I’m ditching the episode numbers. My audio bits are not a podcast, they aren’t really episodes, and keeping track of the numbers is just more work. I will, however, denote in the title that this is an audio post.

I’m also switching to the audio format that comes directly out of Voice Memos on the iPhone rather than doing the work of converting the file to MP3. If you have any issues listening to this audio file please let me know.

Enjoy the listen!

Links

Download Audio File

JSON Feed WordPress plugin

Manton Reece just released the JSON Feed WordPress plugin into the WordPress directory. Making it mad easy to install and support the new spec.

WP Admin → Plugins → Add New, then search for “jsonfeed”.

I’ve updated to this version in the directory so that all future updates come from there as well.

Attending NEPA WordPress Meetup for March 2017

Last night was the NEPA WordPress Meetup for March 2017. It was a panel discussion regarding how agencies use WordPress with Jack Reager of Black Out Design (our gracious host, thanks Jack and team), Liam Dempsey and Lauren Pittenger of LBDesign in the Philadelphia-area, and your’s truly of Condron Media.

As these types of events typically do, the discussion meandered through many different topics including the reasons our agencies have decided to use WordPress as our platform for many of our projects, about how someone can get started using WordPress, about JavaScript and how it is the language that is currently eating the web, and even a bit about baking bread somehow.

One question that was posited by Phil Erb, our moderator for the evening, was what do the agencies or individuals get out of the WordPress community. Most of the answers were focused on what each individual gleans from WordPress-related events. If you’ve read my blog at all you know that I’m a strong advocate for attending events and that I think they have immense value. It was good to see all of the panelists agree on this point. I hope it spurs some in the audience to attend even more events and certainly more events out of the area and bring that energy and knowledge back to our nook in the mountains here in Pennsylvania.

It was a great meetup in a great space. Very glad to have been part of it.

Thanks to Phil and Stephanie for organizing the event, to Jack and his team for opening up their new space to us (they should be proud of the space they’ve created there, it is lovely), to Liam and Lauren for driving a few hours through fog and lastly to Liam for sharing his Duke’s pizza with me.

Post filtering fixes at Homebrew Website Club

Last night Tucker Hottes, Den Temple and I held the first Homebrew Website Club at The Keys in Scranton, PA. I really appreciate that HWC will force me to set aside some time to work on my personal site since it is often neglected for more pressing projects.

During HWC I began trying to fix my crufty URLs for post format filtering on WordPress. Unless I’m missing something, it doesn’t appear that WordPress has “standard” post format filtering out of the box. It can filter by every other post format – statuses, audio, images – but doesn’t for standard posts. I’m almost sure I am missing something. If anyone knows how to do this more elegantly please let me me know. However, I’ve added this functionality myself months ago and now those URLs are cruft free. You can see them in my sidebar.

To do this isn’t trivial. Here are the steps you need to follow:

I’m glad HWC gave me the time to finally fix this as it had been bothering me for a few months. Looking forward to the next HWC where I’ll tackle a few more Indieweb things I’ve been meaning to bolt on.

Angelina Simms on the Philly Burbs WordPress group

Angelina Simms published her experience at WordCamp US this year. Note this bit about the Philly Burbs WordPress group:

Too often, we are surrounded by people who act like they are concerned about your well-being out of self-interest and totally disappear if you don’t fit into their grand scheme of things. That is definitely not the case when it comes to hanging with WordPress people, especially within the burbsWP community.

Related.

Attending the Philly Burbs WordPress meetup

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Do you know the visible signs of a strong community? If you’ve ever attended a Philly Burbs WordPress meetup then you definitely do.

Last night my new coworker Tucker Hottes and I drove the 2.5 hours to Pheonixville, PA for this month’s WordPress meetup in the Philly Burbs meetup group. What we saw during the evening was the clear, visible signs of a healthy, vibrant, and active community.

Those signs were:

  • Conversation – People were talking to one another from the jump. They greeted one another when a new person arrived. And even if they had already found their own seat, they got up and moved to have a conversation with someone else.
  • Inclusivity – No one. No one feels like an outsider at one of these meetups. Race, gender, or distance from the area (like us) doesn’t matter. Everyone feels very welcome.
  • Questions – Lots of questions and answers. And people really trying to help one another.
  • Lingering – After the event was over people stuck around, got more food, chatted more. In fact, if it wasn’t for the long ride home I would have stayed longer.

I’ve attended this meetup before as a presenter in West Chester. And I felt welcome then too and I could feel the strength of the community then as well. This is a well run group and I highly recommend attending one of their meetups if you can.

Oh, if you’re wondering why I’m willing to drive 2.5 hours just for a WordPress meetup. Read this.

FADE INTO A WORDPRESS LOGO

INTERIOR, COFFEE SHOP, HOUSTON, TEXAS

Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress, wearing a WordPress tshirt, brainstorms over a latte.

MULLENWEG, internal dialogue: “How can I get WordPress in front of the Wix customer base for free?”

MULLENWEG: *opens WordPress on his Mac*

….

MULLENWEG: Publishes: “The Wix Mobile App, a WordPress Joint” to his WordPress-powered blog. For free.

Twitter explodes.

INTERIOR, POSH APARTMENT, ISRAEL

Tal Kol, Engineer at Wix, spits his tea all over his computer’s display.

KOL: *opens Medium.com*

KOL: *continues to wait for Medium.com to load gallons of JavaScript*

KOL: Publishes: How I Found Myself Accused of Stealing Code from WordPress

CUT TO: INSIDE A MOVING UBER

Mullenweg cracks a smile while looking at his mobile phone.

CUT TO: IMAGES OF BOTH COMPANY’S SLACK CHATS EXPLODING

INTERIOR, APARTMENT BEDROOM, NEW YORK CITY

Avishai Abrahami, CEO of Wix.com, is stomach-down, in bed, sound asleep.

BZZZZ

BZZZZ

Avishai Abrahami’s mobile phone is vibrating on the nightstand.

BZZZZ

Avishai Abrahami reaches for his phone. His eyes nearly pop out of their sockets.

ABRAHAMI: Sits down at his computer. *opens Wix content management system* …. errr, *opens WordPress Admin*

ABRAHAMI: Publishes: Dear Matt Mullenweg: an open letter from Wix.com’s CEO Avishai Abrahami on Wix’s WordPress-powered blog.

CUT TO: EXTERIOR, PUBLIC PARK, HOUSTON TEXAS

Matt Mullenweg is seen frolicking through fields of green grass.

THE END