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Colin Devroe

Reverse Engineer. Blogger.

Follow: @c2dev2, RSS, JSON, Micro.blog.

Micro.blog is now public

Manton Reece:

Micro.blog is now available to anyone. There’s a limit of 100 new sign-ups each day, so that we can better respond to feedback as the community grows.

I’ve been using Micro.blog on the web, Mac, and iOS for a few months and the community there has been great. In fact, the vast majority of my web site’s comments are webmentions sent from responses on Micro.blog.

Congratulations to Manton for reaching this milestone.

Threads now officially supported on Twitter

Sasank Reddy, on the Twitter blog:

Now, hundreds of thousands of threads are Tweeted every day! But this method of Tweeting, while effective and popular, can be tricky for some to create and it’s often tough to read or discover all the Tweets in a thread. That’s why we’re thrilled to share that we’re making it simpler to thread Tweets together, and to find threads, so it’s easier to express yourself on Twitter and stay informed.

I am not a fan of threads. They are ungainly, hard to follow, and a terrible reading experience.

That said, you cannot control how people will use a platform that you create. You can try to stop things you don’t like. You can attempt to ban a behavior. But that usually doesn’t work. Or you can make adjustments to make it a better experience. Like when Instagram introduced Stories to cut down on people making second accounts. Twitter has chosen to try to make threads on Twitter a little easier to do and hopefully a little easier to follow.

Before I pass judgement on how they’ve done this, I’ll let them iterate on these new features a few times to see if they can get it right. But, overall, I’m not a big fan of threads so even if they build an incredible UI for them I still do not believe I’d like them. But, again, (I can’t write this strongly enough) people are going to write threads on Twitter whether or not Twitter supports them.

As Manton Reece mentioned, I do not think threads are good for the web. But I don’t think they can be eradicated. I like how Micro.blog chooses to turn longer posts into “blog posts” (whatever that means these days) but that wouldn’t be right for Twitter. It is very right for Micro.blog.

I wonder? If I didn’t have a blog – and also didn’t really know how to set one up or had no desire to do so – would I appreciate this feature? I’m thinking I would. Or, I would write longer posts on Facebook and link from Twitter to those posts. Shiver.

The last time I shared Micro.blog invite codes they went very quickly. Here are 5. First come, first served. mb-ed28cc, mb-d0f852, mb-dbb439, mb-9b86e4, mb-c0629e.


Squash – October 2017

This being my penultimate entry into the Micro.blog photo challenge.


Lackawanna Lake – October 2017

Day 5 photo challenge entry.


Coffee bean counter, Duffy’s Coffee Company, Clark’s Summit, PA – November 2017

This being my day 4 photo challenge entry.

Test: GIF of waterfall

This was harder to create from a Live Photo than it should have. And I don’t like the result. But, such is life. Publish! This being my day 3 photo challenge entry.

Doug Lane’s Micro.blog photo challenge

Doug Lane:

I thought we could start on Saturday (Nov. 11) and go for seven days.

He has a theme for each of the 7 days. I’m in.

Micro.blog for Mac beta

Micro.blog:

Mac users can use the native Micro.blog for Mac app. It’s a free download and supports most of the same features as the iOS version.

You can see a short video of it on Manton’s blog. You’ll even notice a rather handsome avatar make an appearance.

Unfortunately I cannot give this a spin yet since I haven’t upgraded my Mac to High Sierra. And it doesn’t appear I’ll be doing so for at least a month or two since I haven’t seen any updates from Apple on that front. High Sierra just seems far too unstable to switch to on my main work computer at the moment.

Colin Walker, though, seems to like this new app:

Manton has repeatedly said that this is just a version 1.0 app but, I have to say, it’s been rock solid. Browsing, replying and posting to the blog have all been a breeze and I’ve not had a single issue or error.

FollowFriday, belated

I was away for the weekend, so this is coming on Monday, sorry.

Jimmy Baum:

Colin Devroe suggested a #FollowFriday movement. I’ll start off with two bloggers I’m enjoying.

Thanks to Jimmy for including me!

Here are two others I suggest following:

  • Manton Reece – Many discussions begin with Manton’s blog as he’s the tip of the spear in microblogging currently. He’s shouldering the responsibility well I think.
  • Jeremy Keith – A veritable cornucopia of interesting links and behind-the-scenes looks at conferences around the world as well as thoughtful discussions that impact the open web. All in one place.